Shilp Vaghela, MD '15 Presents to Radiology Interest Group

Third-semester student Shalom Adams reflects on the opportunity to speak with AUC grad Shilp Vaghela, MD '15 and further hone his interest in radiology.



Written by Shalom Adams

One of the best parts of joining an interest group at AUC is being able to hear from a current doctor—and AUC graduate—in the field of medicine you’re interested in. The Radiology Interest Group recently hosted a Skype call with Dr. Shilp Vaghela, MD ‘15 for over an hour, during which Dr. Vaghela shared insights about the specialty of radiology and his career path since enrolling at AUC. Dr. Vaghela is a PGY-4 radiology resident at Cooper University Health Care in Camden, NJ.

What was great about this event was that Dr. Vaghela had attended AUC for his education, and had been through the same path and courses we will go through. He discussed his journey with us, from starting medical school through his current position. It was very relatable, since he spoke about AUC from his own personal perspective, and what the future holds for us with regard to rotations and residency. 

One thing he explained that was new to me was the difference between a diagnostic radiologist (which he is) and an interventional radiologist. Diagnostic radiology is the field of medicine that uses imaging exams and procedures to diagnose a patient. Interventional radiology, sometimes known as vascular and interventional radiology, is a medical specialty which provides minimally invasive image-guided diagnosis and treatment of disease. 

"When listening to a speech from a doctor about their career, it’s as if they’re speaking directly to you—answering the questions going through all of our minds during medical school."

Dr. Vaghela also went into the aspects of his current job, including work-life balance. While there’s rarely any downtime during the day, he explained that radiology is one of the few specialties that doesn’t have as hectic hours as other fields. He was encouraging throughout the talk, saying, “If I can do it, then you guys can do it.” He stressed working hard on tests, and spoke about how he prepared for exams as early as his first few semesters. At the same time, he was very relaxed and relatable, telling us how he loves St. Maarten and misses it all the time. 

Attending this event made me realize how every doctor really has gone through the same stages. We all have to attend the classes and pass the exams that will ultimately prepare us for the future. Current doctors know the struggles of medical students because after all, they've been in our shoes. So when listening to a speech from a doctor about their career, it’s as if they’re speaking directly to you—answering the questions going through all of our minds during medical school.